Counterfeit PPE: CE Certificate Checklist

carabiners

Counterfeit or illegal items of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) in the market are on the increase. It was initially reported by the BBC over three years ago and referenced by British Safety Industry Federation

Supplying fake PPE can be life-threatening as often this equipment does not perform as they should, compromising users and exposing your organisation to a risk of harm or prosecution. Established equipment manufacturers such as DMM and Petzl are often the targets of counterfeiters looking to make a quick buck from users who are simply looking for replacement equipment to keep them safe.

Papertrail partners with equipment manufacturers such as DMM, launching a revolutionary new technology that helps counteract the rising problem of counterfeit PPE using RFID chips built into equipment at the point of manufacture to provide a durable and scannable unique identify. Read more on how DMM ID helps prevent the use of counterfeit PPE here.

Common types of counterfeit PPE 

Equipment that is popular and easy to reproduce are often targets for counterfeiters; please note: all types of equipment can be counterfeit versions. Examples of counterfeit PPE that have been found to date include anchors; ascenders; descenders; carabiners; dynamic ropes; harnesses; climbing equipment; helmets; goggles; ear defenders and many others. 

Read Petzl’s article with guidance on how to deal with fake equipment. Following these steps:

  1. Immediately remove the equipment from service. 
  2. Contact your in-country equipment supplier. 

How to spot counterfeit or illegal PPE

CE (Conformité Européenne) Certificates are the hardest piece of PPE to fake. All PPE must be supplied with instructions for use and be appropriately tested and marked with a CE marking – without it, the product is illegal to use as protective equipment in the workplace. 

CE Certificate Checklist 

If you answer ‘No’ to one or more of these questions, then contact your PPE suppliers immediately for advice.

ChecklistYesNo
Is the CE mark present on the product marking/labelling?
If present on the product, is the CE mark in the correct font and at least 5mm high?
For products, including respirators and chemical protective clothing, is the CE mark accompanied by a 4-digit number? (e.g. CE 0120)
Were written instructions for use provided within the product?
Are the instructions for use printed in the clear and legible text?
Is the name and address of the manufacturer detailed on the user instructions?
Does the certificate clearly contain the notified body’s name and number (4 digits)?
Is the notified body from within the EU? There are a few non-EU notified bodies and therefore caution should be taken?
Does the certificate show signs of tampering i.e. differing fonts and sizes, colour changes etc?
Does the certificate contain a date and notified body signature? (generally an individual)
Does the certificate have its terms and conditions included?
Does the certificate show a clear description of the product, including model references, specifications, and test references?
Does the certificate state that it is an EC type-examination certificate?
Does the certificate include a manufacturer’s name and address?
If a validity period is stated on the certificate, is it still current?

To confirm the authenticity of PPE, you can call the notified body in your country, who will be happy to check the certificate against their records. Find out who the notified body is in your country here. Alternatively, if you have purchased equipment that has a unique serial number, Barcode or RFID chip, you can validate its authenticity by searching the Papertrail Product Directory

DMM and Singing Rock serial number searches are currently available digitally, with many other reputable equipment manufacturers such as Teufelberger, committing to provide Unique Serials Numbers by 2020 . 

Unique equipment data is available to add to a Papertrail account with one click. The data includes all the certificates and relevant documentation, which should form as part of your equipment management record-keeping system. 

Gathering all the information for your equipment records is often challenging to do with a large inventory of safety equipment. If you are unsure you have all of the relevant paperwork, then it could be a good time to review and improve your inspection management system.

Download our 5 Step Management System Review Workbook, created for equipment managers to ensure your PPE management system is effective.


What is LOLER, and does it affect me?

ropes

What is LOLER?

The Lifting Operation and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER) place responsibilities on equipment managers and companies who own, operate or have control over lifting equipment. All operations involving lifting equipment must be planned by a competent person, the regulation also requires that equipment is fit for purpose, appropriate for the task and suitably marked, with maintenance and defects reported. 

What is lifting equipment?

Lifting equipment includes any equipment that is used in the workplace for lifting or lowering loads, including accessories providing a link between the two. This includes any lifting accessories used for anchoring, fixing or supporting it. 

Examples of lifting equipment according to the HSE:

  • Safety Harnesses and Helmets
  • Overhead cranes and their supporting runways
  • Patient hoists and winches
  • Motor vehicle lifts
  • A building cleaning cradle and its suspension equipment
  • Telehandlers and forklifts
  • Lifting accessories

If you use or manage working at height equipment (Fall Protection, Fall Arrest, Fall Restraint) then you are likely to be familiar with the following equipment types in your inventory that requires a LOLER Inspection certificate: 

Karabiners, Slings, Hitch Cords, Cambium Savers, Pulleys, Friction Devices, Harnesses, Ropes, Swivels, Anchor Rings, Connectors, Ascender/Descender, Figure 8, Fimbl Saver, Lanyards, Mechanical Hitch, Prussiks, Shackles.  All of the above requires a six-month inspection certificate to show they are operating properly and fit for purpose. 

Who must comply with LOLER?

Anyone with responsibility directly or indirectly for work equipment and its use must comply with LOLER, this includes equipment managers, employers, employees, self-employed and those who hire work equipment. Anyone who is accountable for lifting equipment in their company must be aware of LOLER and the procedures.

Working at height Equipment that’s not covered by LOLER

Equipment may appear as ‘lifting’ equipment and thought to be covered by LOLER. Nonetheless, there are some notable exceptions that are not covered by LOLER, when this equipment is used it must be maintained for safety and inspection under the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER). Equipment that is not covered by LOLER includes:

  • pallet trucks, where the consequence of the load falling off is very low
  • roller shutter doors
  • escalators
  • fall arrest ropes
  • tipper trucks

Using Papertrail to comply with LOLER

You are required by LOLER to give your equipment a thorough 6 monthly inspection before completing an inspection report. If you are not already using a management system, Papertrail helps you create a report and guarantees it is saved against each item inspected and ensures it can be reproduced as a PDF print off or digital display at any time. Follow our step by step on how to produce and save a 6 monthly inspection report.

Inspection certificate

With Papertrail, you can set daily, weekly, monthly or 6-monthly inspection schedules for all your equipment, and get notified whenever another inspection is due – so you’ll never forget to make them! Using Papertrail to record these inspections and create the reports needed for LOLER compliance is so much easier and less time-consuming than paper records. 

You can review and improve your inspection management system today for FREE! Download our 5 Step Management System Review Workbook, created for equipment managers to ensure your PPE management system is effective.

5 Steps to review your PPE Management System

5 Safety Regulations You Need to Know

Working at height

Why you must inspect equipment and keep records

As an Equipment Manager, it is necessary to inspect any equipment where there could be risks to health and safety. A risk assessment should be carried out to determine if there is any need for inspections and routine maintenance to ensure the continued safety of your colleagues. Inspections must be recorded and evidenced, a management system like Papertrail can help you complete inspections in a clear, efficient and systematic way.

mandatory-regulations

Regulations to be aware of

There are five main regulations that businesses with safety equipment must consider: 

  1. The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
  2. The Personal Protective Equipment At Work Regulations 1992
  3. PUWER 
  4. LOLER (if you’re using lifting equipment)
  5. WAHR (if you’re working at height)

1. The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974

The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (HSWA, the HSW Act, the 1974 Act or HASAWA) is the main piece of legislation covering occupational health and safety in the UK. The act clarifies the general responsibilities of everyone from employers and employees to owners and managers of the workplace for maintaining health and safety.

2. The Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992

The Personal Protective Equipment At Work Regulations 1992 is a set of regulations created under The Health and Safety Act placing liability on the employer to ensure suitable personal protective equipment has been granted for those who may be exposed to a risk to their health or safety at work.

3. Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER)

These regulations aim to make work safer for anyone using and coming in contact with equipment, this includes employers, employees, contractors, suppliers and people who may need to access any equipment. The regulation ensures that equipment is kept in good order and that maintenance, training and inspections are carried out to suitable and sufficient levels to identify if the equipment can be used. 

4. Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER)

LOLER places responsibilities on people and companies who own, operate or have control over lifting equipment. If any lifting equipment is provided you must manage and control the risks to avoid any injuries or damages.

5. The Work at Height Regulations (WAHR)

Falls from height is one of the biggest causes of deaths and major injuries for the work at height sector. The Work at Height Regulations was introduced to prevent death and injury caused by a fall from height.

Are you complying with these regulations?

Papertrail helps businesses to comply with health and safety regulations, as well as saving time on inspections and reduce risk.

Using Papertrail allows you to inspect several items and add inspections to multiple records at once, this saves you more time in comparison to logging inspection records individually. Read more on the features of Papertrail that can help you complete inspections and keep accurate records. 

You can review and improve your equipment management system today for FREE – created for Equipment Managers. 

Download our 5 Step Management System Review Workbook and discover how Papertrail can meet your safety management needs.

5 Steps to review your PPE Management System

5 Steps to becoming ISO 9001 Certified

quality

About ISO 9001:2015

ISO established ISO 9001:2015 for *quality management systems, it comprises a set of general standard requirements governing the quality management system of certified companies or any other organisations. ISO 9001:2015 is internationally recognised, it is the most used quality management system standard in the world, used in over 170 countries by over a million companies! The standard applies to all types and sizes of organisations, helping you organise processes, improve the efficiency of processes and continually improve.

ISO 9001 is a standard that creates trust. When working with different companies the customer will need to know they can trust you to complete good quality work. Showing them you are certified and comply builds confidence when they work with you.

*What is a Quality Management System (QMS)?

A Quality Management System is a set of documented policies, procedures and responsibilities organised into a structured system of processes to assist an organisation in realising its quality vision, goals and objectives. Businesses in adventure, arboriculture and work-at-height benefit substantially from a standardised system, as the safety risks and service focus in these industries, mean that improving quality management is essential to staying competitive, and staying safe!

Benefits of ISO 9001 Certification

An ISO 9001 certification produces numerous benefits for any business.

Customer Satisfaction
The most important benefit of being ISO 9001:2015 certified is meeting the increasing requirements of customers. Customers want to receive the highest quality of service. ISO 9001 helps you consistently meet customer demands and a service that is dependable and can be relied on.

Reduced operating costs
When adopting a QMS there is a continual improvement of processes resulting in operational efficiencies saving you money overall. This includes your safety management, training procedures and even your staff rota.

Improved stakeholder relationships
Improve the perception of your organisation with staff, customers and suppliers.

Legal compliance
Learn how statutory and regulatory requirements affect your organisation and its customers. Having a robust quality management system in place will also help in establishing a positive safety culture.

Improved risk management
Greater consistency and traceability of products and services means problems are easier to avoid and rectify.

Proven business credentials
Becoming certified by an internationally recognised industry standard speaks volumes.

Ability to generate more business
When obtaining an ISO 9001 certification you must identify and analyse your business processes, this can only be achieved through effective quality management. Corresponding to the requirements will teach you more about how your business functions. Certification opens doors to more business as procurement specifications often require certification to carry out work. Moreover, people are more prepared to pay premium prices for your service if you are ISO certified.

Business, The Next Step, Next, Success, Stairs, Board

Getting started with ISO 9001

Becoming fully certified with ISO 9001 should take between 2-3 months. It is important to think about what the business wants to achieve, there are 5 main steps to become certified.

Step 1 – Preparation
The first step addresses how to prepare for the best execution of the ISO 9001 at your business. You would set the goals and objectives that will benefit your business, look at training and plan your project.

Step 2 – Documentation
To get certified, the standard states that every business must issue and maintain the following six documented procedures.
Control of Documents (4.2.3)
Control of Records (4.2.4)
Internal Audits (8.2.2)
Control of Nonconforming Product / Service (8.3)
Corrective Action (8.5.2)
Preventive Action (8.5.3)

Step 3: Implementation
Next, it is time to implement your ISO 9001 quality management system throughout your company. It is important that all employees understand how the new processes and requirements benefit them, you must ensure the benefits are clear.

Step 4 – Audit
You must evaluate the company to see if all ISO 9001 requirements are being followed.

Step 5 – Certification
After completing the internal audit an independent auditor will visit the business and complete a site audit. The auditor will also perform a site audit after you have collected records worth two months using the processes.

Using Papertrail for ISO 9001

Many Papertrail Subscribers use our off the shelf management system to demonstrate ISO compliance.

You can review and improve your equipment management system today for FREE! By downloading our 5 Step Management system review Workbook, created for equipment Managers to ensure your PPE management system is effective.

5 Step Review Workbook

PPE Management for Contractors: What you need to know

Climbing at height

What is PPE and when should it be used?

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is equipment designed to protect the user against health and safety risks at work. There is a vast range of PPE that provides different types of protection for the user. PPE can be used to protect the eyes, head, body, hands and arms, feet and legs and in high-risk places, the lungs. It can incorporate items such as safety helmets, gloves, eye protection, high-visibility clothing, safety footwear and safety harnesses.

Wearing and using PPE is required when employees or contractors are undertaking high-risk work. So, if you or your team are working at height, that’s classed as high-risk work. It is essential for everyone in the workplace to understand the importance of identifying and wearing the appropriate equipment. Carrying out a risk assessment identifies the hazard(s) that may occur and help to determine what equipment is needed. PPE must be regularly inspected for safety and compliance purposes.

PPE inspections on paper

How to manage work at height PPE

Whenever PPE is used, a detailed record must be created inclusive of the employee’s name, the equipment item, and the date. Many equipment managers create a simple spreadsheet – which indeed will suffice and introduce accountability amongst staff members. However, the more equipment you use results in an expansion of data that must be recorded, this can increase the risk of errors and the amount of time spent documenting inspections.

Volume of equipment graph

The management is often overlooked even though it is necessary when using any equipment, using a PPE Management System can boost the confidence in inspections and management of critical safety equipment.

Who is responsible for PPE?

The Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations (1992) clearly states, according to Regulation 4, “Every employer shall ensure that suitable personal protective equipment is provided to his employees who may be exposed to a risk to their health or safety while at work except where and to the extent that such risk has been adequately controlled by other means which are equally or more effective.” Therefore, according to the law, it is the employer’s responsibility to protect the employee by providing the correct PPE. The regulations also require that the equipment is fit for its objective by correctly assessing it, maintaining and storing the equipment following the manufacturer’s instructions, and utilising it accurately.

It is crucial for equipment owners to look after PPE and to provide suitable storage facilities when it is not in use to keep it clean and in proper condition. Contractors must ensure equipment is kept clean and in excellent repair, following the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule to discover shelf life and replacement periods. Intricate repairs and maintenance should only be completed by specialists, however, simple maintenance of PPE can be carried out by a trained user. Suitable replacement parts for PPE should always be readily available; it is also worth keeping a disposable supply of equipment for any potential visitors and third-party contractors that may be required to wear protective equipment.

Who is responsible for training and compliance?

Employers hold responsibilities concerning the provision and use of PPE supplied for employees. Wherever there is a risk to health and safety, employers are accountable to provide appropriate PPE alongside training to their staff members.

When selecting and using PPE, contractors should use equipment that is CE marked to prove it complies with the regulations. Employers should take the size, fit, and weight of the equipment into consideration when choosing equipment that suits the user; employers are expected to provide appropriate training in its usage. Employees should be informed as to why PPE is required, when to use it, how it can be replaced, and who/how to report any damaged equipment.

Complying with regulations is effectively a joint effort between the contractor and the employee. The contractor is accountable for training, ongoing development and supplying the appropriate equipment, whereas the employee ensures that training is working in practice, the equipment is stored safely and maintained, and that any incidents or faults are reported and fixed properly.

Papertrail User Management for PPE

How Papertrail can help you manage PPE

Papertrail is designed to reduce your workload, increase your productivity and manage health and safety inspections globally. Easily create and manage hundreds of items of equipment records in minutes, our PPE management system allows you to add: your entire equipment inventory – regardless of size, inspection evidence, manufacturer checklists, set reminders and notifications and manage your team’s user permissions. Read more about the features to make your management system work for you!

Are you effectively managing your PPE?

You can review and improve your inspection management system today for FREE! Download our 5 Step Management System Review Workbook, created for Equipment Managers to ensure your PPE management system is effective.

5 Steps to review your PPE Management System

What is a competent person?

Climbing equipment

Competence can be defined as the combination of training, skills, experience and knowledge that a person has and their ability to apply them to perform a task safely. 

A competent person is someone that has a full understanding of the potential hazards related to Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and how to comply with best practice and these regulations. A competent person has had sufficient training and experience or knowledge and other qualities that allow them to help you properly. You must be assisted by a competent person to meet the requirements of the health and safety law when using any equipment. The level of competence demanded depends on the complexity of the circumstances and the help you need.

A competent person is generally set apart from their colleagues and is associated in overseeing, inspecting and auditing the working practices of others.

Who can provide training?

Anyone that provides training on the use of PPE should be sufficiently skilled and trained. The degree of skill of the training provider depends on different factors including the nature of the work equipment, the potential risks. 

Read our PPE Management for Contractors article to learn about who is responsible for training.

An example of when a competent person is needed is when thorough examinations and inspections of lifting equipment are to be completed. The Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER) states, in Regulation 8, that a competent person responsible for planning must have ‘the skills, knowledge and experience to make the relevant assessment of the requirements of the lifting equipment being used and the type of task being carried out’. The inspection and testing of protection devices must also be carried out by a competent person at frequent intervals records of these inspections must be stored securely.

Regulations also state the person carrying out inspections must have the appropriate knowledge and experience of the equipment, this enables them to detect defects and continue to use the equipment safely.

Papertrail is designed for managing PPE and health and safety equipment in your workplace. With Papertrail, you can set daily, weekly, monthly or 6-monthly inspection schedules for all your equipment, and get notified whenever another inspection is due – all inspections are stored securely.

You can review and improve your inspection management system today for FREE! Download our 5 Step Management System Review Workbook, created for equipment managers to ensure your PPE management system is effective.


What is required in an Equipment Management System?

Inspecting equipment

A personal protective equipment (PPE) management system is a system that includes managing, monitoring and maintaining PPE. Most current approaches to PPE management fall short; using spreadsheet software, such as Microsoft Excel, and even paper-based records to complete inspections is still very common.

A PPE management system must track several variables per item, including:

  • Product name
  • Serial number
  • Purchase date
  • Inspection history
  • Latest inspection
  • Current status

Barcoding
Using barcoding software can help you easily pull up product information and details, improving accuracy and reducing human errors.

Reporting tools

Reporting is a critical feature to have in any equipment management system; the information generated quickly in reports will help you increase your efficiency and create a seamless workflow.

Features of Papertrail

Papertrail allows you to build smart checklists, conduct audits and inspections, and file reports straight from your phone. Papertrail features everything you need to keep accurate records and stay compliant.

Each record is time-stamped and can be accessed instantly and even offline to easily access and manage your equipment on the go. Synchronise your mobile device before performing inspections to complete inspections offline. Papertrail is compatible with all iOS and Android devices.

Create, manage and audit your records. Plan in customisable inspection schedules, status reports, workflows, integrations, task management, checklists and care and maintenance schedules using our app. 

Use our PPE Product Directory to look up specific manufacturer product data and equipment information is provided by the Papertrail Partner manufacturers (Papertrail partners). Search for equipment from manufacturers such as DMM, Palm Equipment, Petzl, Singing Rock and Teufelberger and import equipment data seamlessly.

We use barcodes, serial numbers and RFID technology to speed up the process of carrying out inspections and to manage a large inventory of equipment; simply scan the barcode or RFID tag so it appears on the app, then continue to complete any other information.

Quickly and simply generate reports, exports and certificates to provide the evidence you need for proving inspections and compliance.

Engage and work efficiently with your team, manage user permissions and add your team members for accountability. Easily set and restrict folder access with our user management option. 

You can read even more about Papertrail’s great features here.

Review your existing PPE management system and see how you can make your system more efficient. Download our 5 Step Management System Review Workbook, created for equipment managers to ensure your PPE management system is effective and compliant.


Papertrail commits to new arboricultural safety alliance

NATS safety alliance infographic

Here at Papertrail, we believe that creating a culture of safety is only possible when we work together. That’s why we’re excited to announce that we’re working with North American Training Solutions (NATS), Treemagineers,  Teufelberger and DMM in a strategic safety alliance. The alliance’s goal is to develop knowledge, evolve competency training programmes, and produce innovative new solutions and equipment to improve safety and efficiency in the arboricultural industries and beyond.

We’re completely behind the alliance’s founding principles, and the “5 C’s” that you can see in the graphic at the beginning of this article. Compliance and confidence are at the heart of what we do. Our CEO, Ben Scholes said: “The teams, both here at Papertrail and in our partners’ organisations have worked extremely hard to bring this partnership to life. Our ambition and vision is to support this alliance by delivering outstanding software for our customers’ and end users. Overall, we want to improve safety and collaboration throughout the industry, enable easier access to product data and develop innovative new software applications. Together we’re united for safety, and I couldn’t be more proud.”

If you’d like to explore how Papertrail can help keep your business organised, and your people safe, why not book a free demo to find out more?

Papertrail and Palm Equipment announce product data partnership

Papertrail and  Palm Equipment  announce product  data partnership.

Today, Papertrail and Palm Equipment announce their intention to make managing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) product data easier for their customers.

The partnership, launched today, sees all of Palm Equipment’s manufacturer product data, such as product codes, photography, weight, dimensions and user guides, added to Papertrail’s PPE Directory. From there, the product records can be quickly and easily imported to a customer’s Papertrail account, saving time and ensuring that all of their records are accurate and fully updated.

Palm equipment products used in whitewater rafting
Palm Equipment products in action

It is a great resource for existing Papertrail customers and additionally the PPE directory is availably publicly, meaning it can be used by businesses and individuals who need product data for their PPE, without necessarily being a Papertrail user.

Ben Scholes, CEO of Papertrail, said: “We’re delighted to be working with Palm Equipment to make our PPE Directory even better. Now our existing and new customers can seamlessly access full product data for all their Palm equipment, all in one place, and add it to their Papertrail account in a couple of seconds. They’ll not only have a full inspection history for every piece of kit, but they’ll also have full product information in their account from day one.”

Craig Jones, Professional and Commercial Sales Manager at Palm Equipment International Ltd, said: “At Palm we are dedicated to having the best products and providing excellent aftercare, so working with the number one platform for logging and tracking PPE is an ideal partnership for us. With such a broad and comprehensive range, using Papertrail not only takes the sting out of logging Palm PPE, but it goes well beyond by providing full product and aftercare information in one easy to use location.”

Papertrail’s PPE Directory has been updated with Palm Equipment data and is available to access today.

It’s now even easier to import your Palm products to Papertrail.

About Papertrail

Papertrail is a cloud-based digital safety inspection management platform. Initially designed for the work at height and rope access community to help make record keeping for statutory safety inspections simpler, quicker and more straightforward, Papertrail has grown exponentially and is used in inspection management processes in many different market sectors. Today, in over 40 countries worldwide, hundreds of customers use Papertrail to manage millions of records every day. www.papertrail.io  

About Palm Equipment International Ltd.

Gear For Paddlers

Palm Equipment International Ltd is based in Somerset, England. From here we supply Palm apparel and accessories, kayaks from Dagger, Islander and Wilderness Systems, and canoes from Mad River Canoe – everything you need to take to the water. https://palmequipmenteurope.com/

Since 1979


Teufelberger and Papertrail unveil strategic partnership

Teufelberger, the world-leading rope manufacturer, today announced a strategic partnership with the world’s top provider of personal protective equipment (PPE) management platforms, Papertrail.

The partnership will see Papertrail’s inspection management platform being offered to customers alongside selected Teufelberger product lines from 2019.

This will give Teufelberger customers the option of storing and updating product details and inspection results simply and easily at any time, using Papertrail’s cloud-based mobile applications.

“At Teufelberger we provide ropes and equipment for some of the most demanding customers and applications on the planet” said Angela Lloyd, business unit manager for Teufelberger’s Tree Care Division.

“Maintaining this product in top condition is of critical importance to our customers and will be a lot easier to keep digital records thanks to partnership between Teufelberger and Papertrail.”

Ben Scholes, Papertrail’s CEO, said: “Papertrail is the industry standard for inspection, certification and audit management in the PPE Sector. We believe this partnership will bring significant benefits to Teufelberger’s customers, improving safety and quality.”

Teufelberger Products will soon be available to search and add to Papertrail accounts using the PPE Product Directory.

About Teufelberger

Family-owned Teufelberger is a diversified, international group specialising in fibre ropes, steel wire ropes and strapping. Innovation, steady growth and geographic expansion are firmly defined goals in the group strategy. www.teufelberger.com

About Papertrail

Papertrail offers the world’s leading Inspection and compliance management software platform. We make inspection management and safety compliance faster and more efficient, creating operational efficiencies for organisations of all sizes. www.papertrail.io

For more information,

New functionality in Papertrail: Checklists

Since 2013, Papertrail has been developing Inspection management systems for clients; to date over 5 million inspections have been carried out by our users using Papertrail, an achievement that we are proud of and a number that is growing ever larger each day!

We are not resting on our laurels and letting this grow ‘organically’, in fact, we are even more motivated to continue the development of the right features, in conjunction with our users and safety managers and inspectors, to use in their workplace.

Continue Reading…

What do you understand by ‘safety’?

What do you understand by ‘health and safety’? For many business leaders, health and safety is a compliance issue. For the good of society, we have legal checks and balances in place to minimise the chances of accident and infection in the workplace.

Some businesses treat these checks and balances in the same way as some motorists treat speed limits: it’s OK to bend the rules so long as you don’t get caught. In practice, this may mean ticking just enough boxes to give an impression of compliance.

But a growing number of organisations, in my view, are taking a different approach. They recognise that compliance is just a small part of what workplace health and safety is about. What is really important is risk reduction.

Think about it: if someone gets injured in your workplace then you face an increased risk of legal action. You risk operational downtime. Financial loss. Reputational damage. Staff discontent. Recruitment challenges.

On the flip side, having a good health and safety record can pay off with higher staff satisfaction, lower absenteeism and reduced legal, financial and reputational risk.

Seen this way, it makes sense to look at workplace health and safety as something worth investing in. And this investment need not stop with obvious measures, such as staff training and safety equipment procurement.

It could, and should, also cover all the systems and processes needed to maintain a high safety profile, including regular inspection schedules and a smart inspection-tracking platform. Anything else would be taking a risk.

  • Contact us about how to make your organisation safer and more efficient.

Tragedy highlights need for PPE management

An investigation into a tragic accident has once again put the spotlight on the need for
better personal protective equipment (PPE) management.

Zachary Cox’s fatal fall attracted press attention because it happened on an emblematic
site: the Khalifa International Stadium in Doha, which will be used in the Qatar 2022 World
Cup.

The incident, in January 2017, could clearly have been avoided if PPE safety standards had
been up to scratch. An inquest heard Cox was using potentially lethal equipment,
according to a report by the BBC.

Cox was doubly unlucky, the report says. He fell when a faulty hoist broke, but the safety
harness that could have saved his life also snapped. The 40-year- old worker, born in South
Africa but living in the UK, died from multiple injuries after dropping 130 feet.
It is unclear whether Cox’s equipment had undergone regular inspections, but the findings
of the inquest make this seem unlikely.

The coroner for the case said working practices on the site were “inherently unsafe” and
that site managers “knew or should have known that they were effectively requiring a
group of their workers to rely on potentially lethal equipment.”

Following the inquest, Cox’s family called for lessons to be learnt.

One of these must surely be that any major building site should not only have appropriate
working-at- height safety procedures in place, but that these procedures should be
transparent and regularly audited.

As we can attest at Papertrail, putting the systems in place to achieve this is not hard or
costly. And if it helps to preserve lives, surely no expense should be spared.

Contact us now for more information about how to make your organisation safer and
more efficient.

A nightmare on spreadsheet

Running away from spreadsheet monster

Our latest customer case study has all the makings of a Hollywood blockbuster. There’s a faraway location (Sweden, to be precise). A bunch of plucky young adventurers, in the staff of top working-at-height training, products and consultancy firm C2 Vertical Safety.

And then there’s an evil antagonist: the spreadsheet. For inspection recordkeeping, “we tried different systems, but we always ended up coming back to the same spreadsheet nightmare,” says Martin Malmberg, C2’s direct business marketing director.

Like Grendel in the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf, the spreadsheet would come stalking during C2’s darkest moments: when the company carried out its annual midwinter stock-taking exercise.

Then, C2 had to practically shut down for a fortnight so staff could carry out equipment inspections and bring records up to date. But help came from the hand of a stranger from afar.

C2 happened to know a UK company called Lyon, which was using Papertrail to track its Industrial Rope Access Trade Association certifications. C2 was intrigued by the platform’s potential, and that’s how the story came to a happy ending.

“We tried it and fell in love instantly,” says Malmberg. “It’s very easy to learn and easy to use.”

The annual inspection is more efficient thanks to Papertrail. And Papertrail’s ease of deployment and use of the platform is important because C2 now sells the platform to its customers.

Over time, says Malmberg, C2 hopes to use Papertrail’s powerful reporting and analytics capabilities to remind clients when they should be scheduling training and equipment inspections or replacements. Needless to say, we’re looking forward to the sequel.

Read the full case study And contact us for more information about how to make your organisation safer and more efficient.

Get ready to change your view of PPE

If you know Papertrail then you’ll know we’re passionate about modernising the way personal protective equipment (PPE) is managed, to improve safety and efficiency while cutting costs.

It’s a message we try to spread in all our communications, including this blog. And it’s not just us who are banging the drum for more advanced PPE management.

DMM, for example, has been leading developments in PPE for more than 30 years, and is a big advocate for smarter management systems.

That’s why this month I’m delighted to welcome DMM’s product manager, Rob Partridge, on Papertrail’s first-ever webinar: ‘unlocking the secret to smart PPE management.’ This webinar is aimed at novice and experienced PPE managers alike and will help you:

  • See why PPE manufacturers such as DMM now recommend all their customers adopt smart management systems.
  • Understand how you can immediately save money and improve efficiency with smart PPE management.
  • Experience how quick and easy it is to implement smart PPA management systems.

The 45-minute webinar is completely free and will kick off at 4pm GMT on Thursday April 19th. Besides hearing from myself and Rob, you can get to ask us all those niggling questions you’ve been wanting to get answers to.

To make sure you don’t miss you place on this unique webinar, take a minute to sign up now and block out your diary at 4pm on the 19th. I look forward to you joining us for what will undoubtedly be a really valuable interactive session.

FREE WEBINAR – SIGN UP NOW!!